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Valuing failure (Part 1)


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Podcast: Fast Track Impact
Episode: Valuing failure (Part 1)
Pub date: 2019-06-22

This week, Mark explores how you can reframe the failures and rejections that are part of everyday academic life as something that deeply affirms our values and leads to greater meaning and contentment. In part 1, he focuses on how we pick our battles and choose to do things that are high risk but high reward in terms of expressing our values, and how to know when to stop fighting a losing battle in line with our values. Read some of the tweets quoted at the start of the episode.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Mark Reed, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Homelessness and Housing Insecurity in Higher Education


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Podcast: Teaching in Higher Ed
Episode: Homelessness and Housing Insecurity in Higher Education
Pub date: 2019-10-31

Bonni Stachowiak discusses homelessness and housing insecurity in higher education with Rashida Crutchfield and Jennifer Maguire on episode 281 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

Some of our students just don’t want to be seen as being “in need”.
-Rashida Crutchfield

It is that mobility and constant insecurity that is a trauma experience.
-Rashida Crutchfield

It is that fear and stress response that has short and long term impacts on our physiology that manifests in many different ways.
-Rashida Crutchfield

Making the time to do something that is different has given me so much more energy, creativity, and ability to be present to my students.
-Jennifer Maguire

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Cuttlefish in 3D Glasses – Trevor Wardill


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Podcast: Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves.
Episode: Cuttlefish in 3D Glasses – Trevor Wardill
Pub date: 2020-03-03


Why Velcro 3D glasses onto cuttlefish? In Episode 69, Trevor Wardill from the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior at the University of Minnesota discusses his research into the previously unknown ability of the cephalopod to see in stereo vision.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves., which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Undisciplined: Dishing It Out


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Podcast: UnDisciplined
Episode: Undisciplined: Dishing It Out
Pub date: 2020-05-25


We all know that meals bring people together. But when it comes to building trust and cooperation, it turns out that not all meals are created equal. And this week on the program, we’re talking to a researcher whose work has shown that people eating from shared serving plates are more likely to work together rather than compete.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Utah Public Radio, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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What We Talk About When We Talk About Disrupting Science


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Podcast: Science Disrupt
Episode: What We Talk About When We Talk About Disrupting Science
Pub date: 2020-05-26

In this episode, we’re chatting about Science Disrupt 2.0 – what we mean when we talk about ‘disruption’, what deeper conversations we now need to have about science, and how and why our own ideas have evolved over the last 4 years.

We talk about what’s changed in science since 2016, including the more open nature of critical conversation in academia; how the cult of personality (of consultants, startups and VCs) can make a mockery of science and tech, and what deeper questions aren’t being asked while many still problematic practices continue in research and tech transfer.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Science Disrupt, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Psychological Safety for Professors and Students with Amy Edmondson


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Podcast: Half Hour of Heterodoxy
Episode: Psychological Safety for Professors and Students with Amy Edmondson
Pub date: 2020-06-26

Amy Edmondson is my guest on this episode. She’s an organizational psychologist at Harvard Business School and she’s known for her highly influential studies of psychological safety, the sense that you can be honest and open and can take interpersonal risks at your workplace without fear of punishment. She has also published influential papers on team formation, and organizational learning.

We’ll be talking about her book The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation and Growth, published last year and how college and university professors can leverage this research.

 

Related Links

·The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation and Growth by Amy Edmondson

·Teaming: How Organizations Learn, Innovate, and Compete in the Knowledge Economy by Amy Edmondson

·Amy Edmondson’s Faculty Page

·Building a psychologically safe workplace, a TEDx Harvard Graduate School of Education talk

·How to turn a group of strangers into a team, a TEDx New York talk

 

Rating the Show

If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes:

1. Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”

2. Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”

3.Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Heterodox Academy, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Episode 11: What Neuroimaging Can and Cannot Reveal about Our Thoughts with Dr. Russ Poldrack


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Podcast: Psychology In Action Podcast
Episode: Episode 11: What Neuroimaging Can and Cannot Reveal about Our Thoughts with Dr. Russ Poldrack
Pub date: 2019-04-12


Russ Poldrack is back! For our eleventh episode, we sat down with Dr. Poldrack to discuss his book, The New Mind Readers: What Neuroimaging Can and Cannot Reveal about Our Thoughts. Our conversation addresses a number of the most pressing questions in psychology and neuroscience today. Why can we de-code some cognitive functions in the brain, but not others? How might we use neuroimaging to guide personalized medicine? What can we do to ensure our science is conducted in the most reproducible and rigorous ways? And is it really necessary to study the brain in order to understand human behavior?

For a related discussion, check out our previous conversation at: www.psychologyinaction.org/psychology-in-action-1/2018/5/27/episode-7-russ-poldrack

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Psychology In Action Podcast, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Miseducation: Stories about what happens in the classroom


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Podcast: The Story Collider
Episode: Miseducation: Stories about what happens in the classroom
Pub date: 2019-09-20

This week we present two stories from teachers dealing with wild experiences in the classroom.

Part 1:  When his students keep having “accidents” during nap time, kindergarten teacher Alvin Irby investigates

Part 2:  In Aida Rosenbaum’s first month as a high-school science teacher, a fight breaks out between her students.

Alvin Irby received his M.S. in Childhood Education from Bank Street College of Education and his MPA in Public and Nonprofit Management and Policy from New York University. He is a former kindergarten teacher turned award-winning social entrepreneur, comedian, and author. As Founder and Chief Reading Inspirer at Barbershop Books, Irby was awarded the National Book Foundation’s Innovations in Reading Prize. His TED Talk “How to inspire every child to be a lifelong reader” has been viewed over 1 million times. Irby’s clever social commentary and humorous observations earned him a coveted spot in the StandUp NBC national showcase. His fresh perspective and smart brand of humor shine through in his 2018 comedy album “Really Dense.” Irby’s debut children’s book, Gross Greg, combines his passion for early literacy and humor while capturing the hilariously gross behavior of kids everywhere.

Aida Rosenbaum is a high school Earth and Environmental Science teacher at the Bronx Latin School. She is also the science department team leader, a facilitator of the Youth Court, the Gardening Club teacher, a coach of new-teacher mentors, the school EDTech specialist, and a member of the Learning Partners Program working to share best practices between schools. Aida is a native New Yorker who earned her B.A. in Environmental Studies from Mount Holyoke College and her M.P.A. in Earth System Science, Policy, and Management from Columbia University. She has been teaching for 16 years at four different high schools and is currently in her second fellowship as an MƒA Master Teacher. She comes from an entire family of teachers including her grandmother, mother, sister, and husband. In addition to teaching, Aida is a mother of two, a wife, an avid listener of NPR, a bee-keeper, and an outdoor sports enthusiast.

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Erin Barker & Liz Neeley, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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