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152: Creating Moments of Genuine Connection Online


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Podcast: The Cult of Pedagogy Podcast
Episode: 152: Creating Moments of Genuine Connection Online
Pub date: 2020-08-17

One of the most important things we need to accomplish as we move forward into the school year is building relationships with our students. But if you’re teaching online, that task will be more challenging than ever. In this episode I talk with Dave Stuart Jr. about his strategy of creating Moments of Genuine Connection and how we can do that while teaching remotely.

Get Dave’s free mini-course: 10 Tips for Staying Motivated When Teaching in Times of Uncertainty 

See all of Dave’s online courses** at cultofpedagogy.com/dave

 

**I am an affiliate for Dave Stuart Jr.’s online courses. This means I receive a commission for any purchases made through my links.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Jennifer Gonzalez, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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137. Tools for Finding a Research Mentor


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Podcast: Hello PhD
Episode: 137. Tools for Finding a Research Mentor
Pub date: 2020-07-11

There are two conflicting truths for many early-career graduate students:

* The mentor you choose is vitally important, and can impact your ability to complete a PhD and your career trajectory years into the future.* Many students choose a mentor based on feelings, hunches, and hearsay.

Truth 1 should be self-evident by now. A mentor trains you, helps you develop a research program, and ultimately has a say in when and how you graduate.

Later, they will also write you letters of recommendation and speak with the search committee that may consider you for a faculty position.

Toxic mentor relationships have driven countless students away from science altogether, and healthy mentor relationships have acted as a springboard for fruitful research careers.

But what about Truth 2?

Given the importance of choosing a mentor, why do so many students ‘rely on their gut’ when making this life-altering decision?

This week, we talk with a scientist who has developed the tools and framework for making that choice more rigorous, and hopefully, more successful.

Dr. Andres De Los Reyes, PhD

Finding Your Fit

Dr. Andres De Los Reyes has benefited from great mentorship throughout his scientific career. And that experience helped him develop the tools to aid every emerging scientist in their own journey.

He writes about those tools in his book The Early Career Researcher’s Toolbox: Insights Into Mentors, Peer Review, and Landing a Faculty Job.

Dr. De Los Reyes argues that there is no single mentor on earth who is right for every scientist. A student’s goals, personality, and training trajectory are unique, which means that finding the ‘right’ mentor is also individual.

But sorting the mentor needle from the University haystack can be difficult.

Dr. De Los Reyes recommends spending some time understanding which scientific questions really light your fire. He calls it your “burning question,” and understanding what drives your inquiry will help you identify a mentor that can support you.

According to Dr. De Los Reyes, “You might find somebody who does work aligned with that [burning] question. The degree to which you can pursue ideas and studies linked to that question is partially dependent on you, and very heavily dependent on who trains you.”

“Because we only get as much leeway to pursue our questions insofar as those who train us allow us to do so. And mentors vary considerably on how much independence they give to students to pursue questions.”

Seeing STARs

One of the tools in The Early Career Researcher’s Toolbox is called The STAR Framework. It’s a model to help students identify both their own needs and preferences, as well as a way to identify a mentor who will match.

STAR stands for Size, Time, Area, and Resources. A trainee can assess each element to determine whether the mentor can fill their particular need.

For example, ‘Time’ refers to “The quantity and quality of time a mentor spends meeting with their trainees.”

Some trainees may be new students, or postdocs entering a new field. They’ll need MORE time from the mentor for hands-on training, experimental design, or paper editing.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Joshua Hall and Daniel Arneman, PhDz, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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The Missing Link In Evolution with Neil Shubin


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Podcast: Big Brains
Episode: The Missing Link In Evolution with Neil Shubin
Pub date: 2019-07-15

We’re taking a summer break during July, but we’ll be back in August with new episodes telling the stories of leading research with some of the world’s greatest minds. During the break, we’ll be bringing you updated versions of prior episodes.

Evolutionary biologist Neil Shubin spent six years in the Arctic searching for a fossil that could be a missing link between sea and land animals. Shubin shares the story behind his discovery of Tiktaalik, what it has meant for the understanding of human evolution, and how it has impacted the future of genetic research.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from UChicago Podcast Network, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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110: Red flags for errors in papers


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Podcast: Everything Hertz
Episode: 110: Red flags for errors in papers
Pub date: 2020-06-15

We answer a listener question on identifying red flags for errors in papers. Is there a way to better equip peer-reviewers for spotting errors and suspicious data?

More details and links…

  • We answer an audio question from Kim Mitchell.
  • Submit your audio questions via our website
  • Nick Brown’s blogpost on the video game “study”
  • We ran a live survey using Prolific! Go to prolific.com/everythinghertz to get $50 worth of credit for $1
  • Spotting unlikely data in meta-analysis
  • How can make reviewers better at detecting errors in papers?
  • Using a “Red team” to pull apart your papers
  • What do lay people think really happens in peer review?

Other links

Music credits: [Lee Rosevere](freemusicarchive.org/music/Lee_Rosevere/)


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Cite this episode
Quintana, D.S., Heathers, J.A.J. (Hosts). (2020, June 15) “110: Red flags for errors in papers”, Everything Hertz [Audio podcast], DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/VTYNG

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dan Quintana, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Episode 34 – Clarissa Carneiro


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Podcast: ReproducibiliTea Podcast
Episode: Episode 34 – Clarissa Carneiro
Pub date: 2020-06-16


Episode 34 – Clarissa Carneiro

Early in May we talked to Clarissa (@clari_carneiro) from the Brazilian Reproducibility Initiative (@BrRepInitiative). This project is awesome – think many labs for Brazilian biomedical sciences, with a dash of meta in there too! Tune in to hear about this amazing project.

Links:
The project: https://www.reprodutibilidade.bio.br/home
The team: https://www.reprodutibilidade.bio.br/team
Partners: https://www.reprodutibilidade.bio.br/partners

Music credit: Kevin MacLeod – Funkeriffic
freepd.com/misc.php

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from ReproducibiliTea Podcast, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Undisciplined: Social Disorder


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Podcast: UnDisciplined
Episode: Undisciplined: Social Disorder
Pub date: 2020-08-20


If you are a frequent participant in a social media community, you know what it’s like when someone new comes along and just doesn’t seem to understand or care about the established rules. But our guest this week wanted to know what happens when newcomers join spaces where the rules aren’t just very well established, but also really toxic.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Utah Public Radio, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Episode 31: Science 2.0


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Podcast: Voices from DARPA
Episode: Episode 31: Science 2.0
Pub date: 2020-08-17

 

In this thematic episode of the Voices from DARPA podcast, three program managers discuss the possibility that emerging technologies in the arena of artificial intelligence (AI) are converging toward an “artificial-science” toolset that could open an era we might designate as Science 2.0. The prospect of AI scientists making Nobel-prize-caliber discoveries is not around the corner, but it is a distinct possibility for the future, suggests program manager Jiangying Zhou of the agency’s Defense Sciences Office (DSO). On the way toward that ideal, adds program manager Joshua Elliott of the Information Innovation Office (I2O), we are likely to rely on scientifically-minded AI tools to pump up the efficiency of scientific discovery and to tap into the vast and growing reservoirs of data, which biological minds might not be as suited to make sense of as AI ones. For Bartlett Russell, also of DSO, perhaps the most important advance during the evolution toward a Science 2.0 era will reside in the use of AI tools that enable more people than ever to embrace the scientific enterprise. The more minds doing science, she says, the more discovery we can expect.

 

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136: Six Ed Tech Tools to Try in 2020


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Podcast: The Cult of Pedagogy Podcast
Episode: 136: Six Ed Tech Tools to Try in 2020
Pub date: 2020-01-07

It’s a new year and it’s a great time to try out a few new tech tools. Here’s my annual round-up of apps and sites I think are worth a look, plus two more extra just for the heck of it. The 2020 Teacher’s Guide to Tech is now available at https://teachersguidetotech.com/guide/

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Jennifer Gonzalez, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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