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Podcasting for Impact: interview with Prof James Daybell from Histories of the Unexpected podcast


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Podcast: Fast Track Impact
Episode: Podcasting for Impact: interview with Prof James Daybell from Histories of the Unexpected podcast
Pub date: 2019-06-26


Have you ever thought about starting a podcast? This week, Mark talks to an academic whose podcast gets 1.5 million downloads a year and has spun off into a book series and live show. Together, they follow James’ story from a history academic who doubted anyone would be in his research, and consider the unique benefits of podcasting for impact. The episode finishes with their tips on how you can pick up the microphone and start one yourself. Read the blog version of this episode here: https://www.fasttrackimpact.com/single-post/2019/06/26/Podcasting-for-impact

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Mark Reed, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Alex Taylor on research at the boundaries, moving from industry to academia, the labour of academia & the power of the collective


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Podcast: Changing Academic Life
Episode: Alex Taylor on research at the boundaries, moving from industry to academia, the labour of academia & the power of the collective
Pub date: 2019-07-24

See http://www.changingacademiclife.com/blog/2019/7/24/alex-taylor for a time-stamped overview of the conversation and related links.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Geraldine Fitzpatrick, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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509: Studying Social Behavior, Reproduction, and Health in Female-Dominant Species – Dr. Christine Drea


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Podcast: People Behind the Science Podcast – Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
Episode: 509: Studying Social Behavior, Reproduction, and Health in Female-Dominant Species – Dr. Christine Drea
Pub date: 2019-07-08

Dr. Christine Drea is the Earl D. McLean Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, as well as Professor in the Department of Biology, the University Program in Ecology, and the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences at Duke University. Research in Christine’s lab examines animal behavior from an integrative perspective. She and her colleagues are investigating the genetic, behavioral, cognitive, sensory, and endocrine mechanisms involved in social interactions and communication in socially complex animals. Christine focuses primarily on female-dominant species such as hyenas, lemurs, and meerkats. Christine’s hobbies outside of science include gardening, playing and walking with her two dogs, and traveling. Christine completed her undergraduate training in zoology at the University of Maryland College Park. She earned her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in psychobiology from Emory University. Afterwards, Christine conducted postdoctoral research in physiology at the Morehouse School of Medicine, and subsequently she was awarded a National Institutes of Health National Research Service Award postdoctoral fellowship in psychology to conduct research at the University of California, Berkeley. Next, Christine served as a lecturer at UC, Berkeley before joining the faculty at Duke University. At Duke, she has been awarded the Thomas Langford Lectureship Award for the appeal of her research to an interdisciplinary audience and her embodiment of Langford’s dedication to teaching, research, and service. In our interview Christine will share more about her life and science.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Marie McNeely, featuring top scientists speaking about their life and c, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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BS 166: Stephen Macknik talks about Vision Research


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Podcast: Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone
Episode: BS 166: Stephen Macknik talks about Vision Research
Pub date: 2020-01-24

Brain Science 166 features the return of neuroscientist Stephen Macknik. We talk about his recent work that is focused on developing a new visual prosthesis based on recent discoveries and techniques like optogenetics.

This episode is more technical than usual but Dr. Macknik makes the material accessible to all listeners.

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Contact Dr. Campbell:

  • Email: brainsciencepodcast@gmail.com
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Faculty at a State School


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Podcast: Vanderbilt Beyond the Lab podcast
Episode: Faculty at a State School
Pub date: 2020-01-21

Former postdoctoral fellow alumnus AJ Baucum returns to campus to share his insight on his role as a primary faculty member at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Vanderbilt University, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Intentional and Transparent Assessment


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Podcast: Teaching in Higher Ed
Episode: Intentional and Transparent Assessment
Pub date: 2019-05-30

Natasha Jankowski shares about intentional and transparent assessment on episode 259 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

Natasha JankowskiWhen I’m asking you to do something in my class, I can tell you why I’m asking you to do it.
—Natasha Jankowski

This is much more assessment with and not to students.
—Natasha Jankowski

Transparency for me is more than just posting it somewhere.
—Natasha Jankowski

How can you both share that love and excitement but also instill it in your students?
—Natasha Jankowski

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Concern: Stories about being worried


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Podcast: The Story Collider
Episode: Concern: Stories about being worried
Pub date: 2019-07-12

This week we present two stories from people gripped with concern for others.

Part 1: When biologist Andrew Holding’s new baby stops feeding, his scientific instincts are put to the test.

Part 2: After finding out her mother has breast cancer, high school teacher Nakeysha Roberts Washington gets hit with the news that one of her students has a brain tumor.

Andrew Holding is a Senior Research Associate at Cancer Research UK’s Cambridge Institute and a Fellow of Downing College, Cambridge. His research programme brings together his experience of cutting edge mass spectrometry, DNA and RNA sequencing techniques with computational biology to investigate the function of the nuclear receptors. Andrew has worked on many science outreach and public engagement projects including founding and organising Skeptics in the Pub in Cambridge, which holds monthly talks by various speakers with the aim of highlighting the application of critical thinking and scientific method.

Nakeysha Roberts Washington, M.S. Ed is the owner and Creative Director of Genre: Urban Arts (GUA), a platform where artists can become published digitally and in print. Nakeysha spends much of her time preparing opportunities for creatives to share their art as part of the necessity for inclusion. All of this with the knowledge that working in the space of developing yourself as a creative is often seen as a privilege. Pop-up galleries and performances organized by Nakeysha via Gene: Urban Arts allows everyone in the creative community the ability to develop themselves as artists, become published and showcase their art through performance and exhibition. GUA is now a playground for 85+ creatives, all who have their own medium in which they create— Their own Genre. Nakeysha has been published in Routledge, various literary journals, and anthologies. In Spring 2018, she was honored with having a monologue performed in Brooklyn, New York, at the Billie Holiday Theater as part of a showcase entitled 50 in 50: What Place Do We Have in this Movement? Also in Spring of 2018, Nakeysha was a presenter at the UWM National Writing Project in which she conducted a creative writing workshop for educators. In June of 2018, a piece of her creative nonfiction entitled, “No Cream” was published in Wisconsin’s Emerging Writers: An Anthology of Nonfiction. In 2019 Nakeysha happily accepted a position as a producer with her favorite podcast The Story Collider as the “Midwest Connect” as she will be producing shows in Chicago, IL and Milwaukee, WI. Additionally, she will begin work on obtaining a doctoral degree in Urban Education at the University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee. Looking forward to July 2019, Nakeysha will be part of a panel at Modern Language Association’s 2019 International Symposium in Lisbon, Portugal as part of a panel to discuss culturally responsive pedagogy in relationship to the teaching of writing, an opportunity afforded to her through her connection with the University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee’s ACCESS program. Nakeysha’s writing and other work centers around social justice issues because she believes that it is a creative’s responsibility to interrogate and reveal the intricacies of social constructs through art.

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What Great Coaching Looks Like


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Podcast: HBR IdeaCast
Episode: What Great Coaching Looks Like
Pub date: 2019-09-10


Richard Boyatzis, professor at Case Western Reserve University, says that every professional can benefit from having a coach — and serving as one for someone else. He says that a coaching relationship moves beyond mentoring or sponsoring in that it focuses on long-term values and aspirations. The best coaches encourage a positive mindset and ask probing questions to help people make the best choices, not only in their careers but also in their personal lives. Boyatzis is coauthor of the HBR article “Coaching for Change.”

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Harvard Business Review, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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