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Technology Transfer and Partnerships


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Podcast: Vanderbilt Beyond the Lab podcast
Episode: Technology Transfer and Partnerships
Pub date: 2019-12-10

Dr. Margaret Read, PhD, reminds us that we are always a scientist, regardless of what career path we pursue. Learn more about her particular role as the General Manger of Corporate Alliances, Center for Technology Transfer and Commercialization at Vanderbilt University.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Vanderbilt University, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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135: The Time I Made a Fart Sound During a Test


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Podcast: The Cult of Pedagogy Podcast
Episode: 135: The Time I Made a Fart Sound During a Test
Pub date: 2019-11-24

Just a little story for you; the title says it all. 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Jennifer Gonzalez, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Ep 173: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Stephania Fregosi on Data and Methods in Sustainability Research – Bonus Clip # 1 – Stephania’s Educational Background and Professional Pathway


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Podcast: Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more
Episode: Ep 173: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Stephania Fregosi on Data and Methods in Sustainability Research – Bonus Clip # 1 – Stephania’s Educational Background and Professional Pathway
Pub date: 2019-09-30

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:49]: Stephania’s Educational Background and Professional Pathway

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Katie Linder, Director of the Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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UnDisciplined: The Microbial Pathologist And The Computational Social Scientist


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Podcast: UnDisciplined
Episode: UnDisciplined: The Microbial Pathologist And The Computational Social Scientist
Pub date: 2019-10-04


This week on UnDisciplined, we’re talking about two ideas that fly in the face of conventional thought. One of our guests will tell us about the creatures in our gut — bacteria. The other will talk about an idea in many of our heads about how fake news impacts the political process.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Utah Public Radio, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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93: Double-blind peer review vs. open science


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Podcast: Everything Hertz
Episode: 93: Double-blind peer review vs. open science
Pub date: 2019-10-07

Dan and James answer a listener question on how to navigate open science practices, such as preprints and open code repositories, in light of double-blind reviews.

Stuff they cover:

  • How common is double-blind review?
  • How many journals don’t accept preprints?
  • Bias in the review process
  • How practical is blinded review?
  • Do the benefits of preprints outweighs not having blinded review?
  • James’ approach to getting comments on his preprints
  • Convincing your supervisor to adopt open science practices
  • The preprint that James won’t submit for publication, for some reason
  • We get reviews…
  • Our first live guest!

Other links

Music credits: [Lee Rosevere](freemusicarchive.org/music/Lee_Rosevere/)


Support us on Patreon and get bonus stuff!

  • $1 a month or more: Monthly newsletter + Access to behind-the-scenes photos & video via the Patreon app + the the warm feeling you’re supporting the show
  • $5 a month or more: All the stuff you get in the one dollar tier PLUS a bonus mini episode every month (extras + the bits we couldn’t include in our regular episodes)

Citation
Quintana, D.S., Heathers, J.A.J. (Hosts). (2019, October 7) “Double-blind peer review vs. Open Science”, Everything Hertz [Audio podcast], DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/7ZPME

Support Everything Hertz

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dan Quintana, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Starting A ReproducibiliTea Journal Club With Jade Pickering And Angelika Stefan


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Podcast: ReproducibiliTea Podcast
Episode: Starting A ReproducibiliTea Journal Club With Jade Pickering And Angelika Stefan
Pub date: 2019-10-15


Episode 25 – Starting A ReproducibiliTea Journal Club With Jade Pickering And Angelika Stefan

Why did we start the ReproducibiliTea Journal club, and how can you start your own? Sam and Amy share their experiences before we listen in on a discussion with two very special guests. Jade Pickering (@Jade_Pickering) and Angelika Stefan (@ephemeralidea) discuss their experiences starting and running a ReproducibiliTea Journal club.

You can find ours, and others’, ReproducibiliTea JC materials (including a starter pack) here: https://osf.io/3qrj6/

visit reproducibilitea.org for more information on starting your own JC, and all the info on the other jcs!

Music credit: Kevin MacLeod – Funkeriffic
freepd.com/misc.php

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from ReproducibiliTea Podcast, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Transformative and disruptive impact. Part 1 – for your research


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Podcast: Fast Track Impact
Episode: Transformative and disruptive impact. Part 1 – for your research
Pub date: 2019-06-22


This week, Mark asks questions that can enable you to achieve impacts from your research that disrupt old ways of doing things and lead to fundamental transformations in organizations and society. Based on different ways of conceptualizing​ resilience, this episode will make you rethink your ambitions for impact to dream bigger and achieve transformational change.

The questions:

1. How can my research strengthen people and organizations​ so that they are able to withstand or resist change, and continue to provide or get the outcomes or benefits they need?
2. Can my research enable a person or organization​ to change what it does and how it does things so that they can protect their core mission and still achieve the things that are most important to them?
3. How can my research enable people to look completely differently at old problems, or disrupt old ways of doing things, so that people and organizations​​s can do completely new things in new ways that are actually valued more than the old ways of doing things and the things they produced?
4. Can my research help a person or organization become more robust so they can resist change and maintain what’s most important to them in a changing world?

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Mark Reed, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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122: Tenure Tracker – The Life Non-Linear with Dr. Jimena Giudice


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Podcast: Hello PhD
Episode: 122: Tenure Tracker – The Life Non-Linear with Dr. Jimena Giudice
Pub date: 2019-10-11

Dr. Jimena Giudice has all the traits of a promising new faculty member.

Through her training and early career, she has earned more than a dozen grants and awards. She’s co-authored two dozen papers. And she has trained students and postdocs, gaining a reputation as a highly effective mentor.

You’d expect that Dr. Giudice’s undeniable success was the natural result of an early immersion in science and a dogged adherence to the well-worn path through college, grad school, and postdoc.

But of course, you’d be wrong. Before discovering a love for scientific research, Dr. Giudice spent ten years answering a different calling.

Changing Focus

Dr. Jimena Giudice

Growing up in Argentina, Jimena didn’t know that her eventual career in science was even an option.

“My parents are architects, my sister is an architect, my cousins are architects, uncles are architects or graphic designers. So I really didn’t have anyone close that I could imagine you could do science as a career,” she recalls.

So after high school, she enrolled in college to study industrial engineering.

Four years into a six year degree, she put her studies on hold and made a personal decision.

“I changed my path, and that’s when I started considering being a nun. I entered a congregation when I was 21.”

Jimena knew that after three years in the congregation, she’d have the opportunity get back to school to continue her studies. Her congregation was focused on education, which gave her valuable experience.

“I was teaching at different levels. Primary school, kindergarten, secondary school, people in the street, rural schools. I was full time working and teaching,” she says.

As her fourth year of service approached, she started to think about what she could study during the next three years that would help in her congregation. She visited the university to explore the available courses, and found that her options expanded well beyond the architecture and engineering paths she had known as a child.

“I remember the first image I have in my head is seeing students with white lab coats and the labs with glass windows and walls. And I have that image in my mind. I said ‘That’s what I want. I want to do that. I want to be with a white lab coat doing what they were doing.’”

That moment was transformative. Afterwards, she says, “I always had the dream of doing experiments, even though I liked education and teaching. Thats when I saw for the first time that science is something where you can study and work and have a career.”

One Good Turn

With her passion for science ignited, Jimena had a new problem. A chemistry degree in Argentina takes six years, but her congregation allowed just three years to pursue a degree while also working during the day.

She did the majority her classes at night, and traveled an hour and a half between the community where she lived and the university.

“I had to multi-task a lot of things. My philosophy was: when I am in classes, I am in classes, and I have to get as much as I can from here because I don’t have a lot of time to study at home,” she remembers.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Joshua Hall and Daniel Arneman, PhDz, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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