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118: Evidence-free gatekeeping


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Podcast: Everything Hertz
Episode: 118: Evidence-free gatekeeping
Pub date: 2020-10-19

Dan and James answer audio listener questions on the worst review comments they’ve received (and how the responded), their thoughts on the current state of preprints, and how institutional prestige influences researcher evaluations.

Other points and links:

Other links

Music credits: [Lee Rosevere](freemusicarchive.org/music/Lee_Rosevere/)


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Episode citation

Quintana, D.S., Heathers, J.A.J. (Hosts). (2020, October 19) “118: Evidence-free gatekeeping”, Everything Hertz [Audio podcast], DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/RAVXK

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dan Quintana, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Labor Day: Stories about trying to make a baby


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Podcast: The Story Collider
Episode: Labor Day: Stories about trying to make a baby
Pub date: 2019-08-30

This week we’re presenting two stories about people trying to become parents.

Part 1: After finally getting together in their forties, Chris Wade and his wife are determined to have a baby — even if it means following some unconventional advice.

Part 2: Struggling to conceive, Sara Sweet makes her third attempt at intrauterine insemination just before her family’s Christmas gathering.

Chris Wade is a native Washingtonian and a retired member of the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, DC. He is a Certified Healthcare Protection Administrator and currently works in healthcare security. Chris is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University Police Executive Leadership Program, is a certified Mental Health First Aid instructor and a certified CPI Nonviolent Crisis Intervention instructor. He is married to his best friend and simply adores his children. His life is filled with countless adventures which he is willing to share through storytelling.

Sara Sweet is a writer and storyteller from Boston. She is a Moth Grand Slam champion and has been a featured teller with Fugitive Stories, Now Hear This, Listen Up Storytelling, Life Is Good and the Moth MainStage.Sara and her husband are aunt and uncle to 8 nieces and nephews.

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Erin Barker, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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38: Clinical Trials, COVID-19, and Ethics


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Podcast: Useful Science
Episode: 38: Clinical Trials, COVID-19, and Ethics
Pub date: 2020-07-07

[https://www.usefulscience.org/podcast/38](https://www.usefulscience.org/podcast/38)

The Useful Science team provides a breakdown on clinical trials – what they are, why they matter, and how long they take. As a wave of urgent clinical trials related to COVID19 is unfolding around the world, researchers try to balance the need for vaccines & treatment with ethical concerns and the health of study participants.

Music by [Solomon Krause-Imlach](https://solomonkrauseimlach.com/).

Follow us @usefulsci or email us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).

## Show Notes

* [Ethics of controlled human infection to address COVID-19](https://science.sciencemag.org/content/368/6493/832)

* [What risks should be permissible in controlled human infection model studies?](https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bioe.12736)

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Useful Science, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Why Work-From-Anywhere Is Here to Stay


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Podcast: HBR IdeaCast
Episode: Why Work-From-Anywhere Is Here to Stay
Pub date: 2020-10-20


Prithwiraj (Raj) Choudhury, associate professor at Harvard Business School, was studying the growing work-from-anywhere movement long before the Covid-19 pandemic forced many more of us into virtual work. He says that more and more organizations are adopting WFA as a business strategy, one that not only reduces real estate costs but also boosts employee engagement and productivity. He acknowledges that there are challenges to creating and maintaining all-remote workforces but outlines research-based best practices for overcoming them. Choudhury is the author of the HBR article “Our Work from Anywhere Future.”

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Harvard Business Review, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Undisciplined: Here Come The Cyborg Locusts


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Podcast: UnDisciplined
Episode: Undisciplined: Here Come The Cyborg Locusts
Pub date: 2020-10-15


Since the dawn of agriculture, locusts have been a scourge for farmers around the world. But a new study suggests that while we’ve long been focused on the harms locust can cause, we might be missing out on the benefits. For instance, and this is just one example, locusts are really good at detecting explosives.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Utah Public Radio, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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[From the Archive] Ep 116: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. Mary Kite on Validity, Sampling, and Meta-analysis


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Podcast: Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more
Episode: [From the Archive] Ep 116: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. Mary Kite on Validity, Sampling, and Meta-analysis
Pub date: 2020-07-20

On this episode, Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Dr. Mary Kite. Mary Kite received her B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. from Purdue University. A social psychologist, she is currently Professor of Social Psychology at Ball State University. Strongly committed to psychology education at all levels, she is Past-President of The Society for the Teaching of Psychology (STP, APA Division 2); she has held a number of other leadership roles for STP. She also chaired the APA Presidential Task Force on Diversity Education Resources and is Past President of the Midwestern Psychological Association. She is a Fellow of APA Divisions 2, 8, 9, 35, & 44 and of the Association for Psychological Science and the Midwestern Psychological Association. She maintains an active research program in the area of stereotyping and prejudice, including co-authoring The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination (3e) with Bernard Whitley, Jr.; Kite and Whitley also co-authored Principles of Research in Behavioral Science (4e). Recognitions include the Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching in Psychology from the American Psychological Foundation (2014) and a Presidential Citation from the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (2011). She was selected as a G. Stanley Hall Lecturer for the American Psychological Association in 2009 and was named a Minority Access National Role Model in 2007.

Segment 1: External Validity [00:00-08:03]

In this first segment, Dr. Kite discusses the importance of external validity in experimental research.

In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:

Segment 2: Sampling [08:04-18:12]

In segment two, Dr. Kite discusses sampling issues in quantitative research methods.

In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:

  • Arnett, J. (2008). The neglected 95%: Why American psychology needs to become less American. American Psychologist, 67, 602-614.
  • Fraley, R. C. (2007). Using the Internet for personality research. In R. W. Robins, R. C. Fraley, & R. F. Krueger (Eds.), Handbook of research methods in personality psychology (pp. 130-148). New York: Guilford.
  • Henrich, J., Heine, S. J. & Norenzayan, A. (2010). The weirdest people in the world? Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 33, 61-135.
  • Henry, P. J. (2008). College sophomores in the laboratory redux: Influences of a narrow data base on social psychology’s view of the nature of prejudice. Psychological Inquiry, 19, 49-71.
  • Kraut, R., Olson, J., Banaji, M., Bruckman, A., Cohen, J., & Couper, M. (2004). Psychological research online: Report of Board of Scientific Affairs’ Advisory Group on the conduct of research on the Internet. American Psychologist, 59, 105-117.
  • Rosenthal, R., & Rosnow, R. L. (1975). The volunteer subject. New York: Wiley.
  • Amazon Mechanical Turk
  • Qualitrics

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: [email protected] Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Katie Linder, Director of the Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Shame: Stories about the judgment of others


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Podcast: The Story Collider
Episode: Shame: Stories about the judgment of others
Pub date: 2020-07-24

This week we present two stories from people who felt shamed by a diagnosis.

Part 1: Jamie Brickhouse’s HIV-positive status becomes a point of tension at the dentist’s office.

Part 2: Diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder as a child, Anders Lee struggles with this identity as an adult preparing to donate sperm.

Called “a natural raconteur” by the Washington Post, Jamie Brickhouse is the New York Times published author of Dangerous When Wet: A Memoir of Booze, Sex, and My Mother, and he’s appeared on PBS-TV’s Stories from the Stage, The Moth Podcast, Risk! Podcast, Story Collider Podcast, and recorded voice-overs for the legendary cartoon Beavis and Butthead. He is a four-time Moth StorySLAM champion, National Storytelling Network Grand Slam winner, and Literary Death Match champ. Jamie tours two award-winning solo shows, Dangerous When Wet, based on his critically-acclaimed memoir, and I Favor My Daddy, based on his forthcoming memoir. A fixture on the New York storytelling circuit, he has appeared on stages across the country and in Mexico and Canada. Jamie’s personal essays have been published in the New York Times, International Herald Tribune, Washington Post, Daily Beast, Salon, Out, Huffington Post, and POZ. Friend him on Facebook, follow him on Instagram, Twitter and YouTube @jamiebrickhouse, and visit www.jamiebrickhouse.com.

Anders Lee is a DC based comedian and writer featured on TV’s Redacted Tonight and the podcast Pod Damn America.

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Erin Barker, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Psychological Science and Preying on Predatory Journals


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Podcast: Social Science Hour
Episode: Psychological Science and Preying on Predatory Journals
Pub date: 2019-03-29

Clinical psychologist Dr. Caleb Lack joins Matthew to chat about his journey into psychology, his innovative teaching methods, and his research on topics from evidence-based psychotherapy to the link between religiosity and intelligence. Dr. Lack also shares his story of dealing with a predatory academic journal!

Dr. Lack’s website:

https://www.caleblack.com/index.html 

Secular Therapy Project:

https://www.seculartherapy.org/ 

Dr. Lack’s story of preying on a predatory journal:

https://centerforinquiry.org/blog/preying-on-the-predatory-journals-a-case-study/ 

 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Matthew Facciani, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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